FemVue for Infertility Treatment in Ocala FL

What is FemVue?

FemVue is a reliable & convenient test that allows Dr. Riley to quickly check if your tubes are open or blocked in their office as part of your initial infertility work-up. Blocked fallopian tubes are usually a silent infertility factor. Approximately 1 in 3 infertile women are living with blocked tubes and most have no symptoms.1

FemVue logo

Factors that can lead to blocked tubes:

• Previous pelvic infection
• Sexually transmitted diseases (STD)
• Prior surgery (abdominal)
• Prior ectopic pregnancy
Endometriosis
• Unknown

The only way to know if this is the reason you’re not getting pregnant is to check your tubes.

What Happens During the FemVue Test?

First, transvaginal ultrasound is used to look at your anatomy in more detail. Then, a thin balloon catheter is placed into your uterine cavity and FemVue is used to start the fallopian tube test. FemVue creates natural saline and air “bubbles” that are seen with ultrasound and allows Dr. Riley to determine if your tubes are open or blocked. The results of the test are available to you immediately and Dr. Riley can discuss possible next steps within the same visit.

Frequently Asked Questions About FemVue

When is the test performed?
Your test will be scheduled during the first half of your menstrual cycle, before you ovulate, to reduce the chance of performing the test when you may be unknowingly pregnant.

Is the test uncomfortable?
You may experience mild or moderate uterine cramping during the test.

Will I be given anything for possible discomfort?
Dr. Riley may advise you to take medications used for menstrual cramps to reduce discomfort.

When can I expect to know the results of the test?
You will know your results during or right after the test.

Can I still get pregnant if my tubes are blocked?
Even if your tubes are blocked, there are ways to overcome this problem and still get pregnant. Consult with Dr. Riley for recommendations and possible next steps.

1. Beverley, et al. (2018) Evaluation of Tubal Patency with a Saline-Air Device. Journal of Reproductive Medicine; 63(3):120-126.